Legislative scrutiny in the House of Lords

41ft2xa+sQL__SX331_BO1,204,203,200_I have received my copy of Parliament: Legislation and Accountability, edited by Alexander Horne and Andrew Le Seuer.  Part I looks at different aspects of the legislative process and Part 2 at accountability, including the regulation of lobbyists and the implications for Parliament of automated decision-making.  I have a chapter, in Part 1, on the legislative process in the House of Lords.

How the House fulfils this task is determined by its relationship to the first chamber and its ability to fulfil it facilitated by its procedures and its membership.  The House sees its role as complementary to the elected chamber.  The Commons can determine the ends of legislation, so the Lords addresses the means.  Its procedures differ from those in the Commons and enable it to engage in detailed scrutiny and its membership (in terms of its political composition and individual members) enables that scrutiny to be effective.  The House of Commons, I contend, is characterised by the politics of assertion and the Lords by the politics of justification.

For more, feel free to get a copy of the book….

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About Lord Norton

Professor of Government at Hull University, and Member of the House of Lords
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4 Responses to Legislative scrutiny in the House of Lords

  1. tizres says:

    Lord Norton, you’ve certainly mastered the strategy of loss leaders.

    • Tizres,
      My blog is, for now, active again. Perhaps Cracking Cheese can crank up for some new posts as well?
      Sorry to double in this site for all that — but such is the way the worldwide web weaves today…

  2. maude elwes says:

    Mmm – LN,. This book doesn’t go into the bookshops until June 2nd and at £55.00 a hit puts it out of the grasp of most students. Which is a great pity as the write up on it sounds great.

    Not that I am a student.

    ME

  3. I imagine it must be an interesting journey into the relationships between “scrutiny” and “process”. The imagination runs wild but that is all I have to work with just now…

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