And the winner of the Brexit contest…

imagesSF9B1IEKI thought the latest caption competition was challenging, but readers have proved how inventive they can be.  The entries were notable for their quantity and quality.  As a result, I faced the usual problem of choosing a winner.  One reader – Dean B – almost won a prize for his comment on one of the entries!  D F Rostron was very keen and submitted multiple entries.  Who’s stolen the comfy chair also put in a couple of entries.  One – ‘Mr Stuart to the Secretary of State: “Will Susie Dent accept Brexit yet… the word I mean?!’ – struck a chord.  I fear it was a word that grated when I heard it delivered in the Queen’s Speech.

I managed to produce a short list of four.  I was tickled by Pendragon’s ‘Maybe we could get Theresa May to make up a fourth for our version of Mount Rushmore’ and Jonathan’s  ‘£350 million would pay for proper lighting in all university conference rooms.  Or have we allocated that money already?’  However, after much deliberation, I decided the runner-up was hullwarstudies with ‘Stuart: Ah, finally the UK’s leading constitutional expert and a Cabinet minister; can you tell me what the long term impact of Brexit will be?’  The winner, because it made me  laugh most, was John Stephens with: ‘So I said to Boris, “Don’t bother reading the Queen’s Speech..’.

If John Stephens would like to get in touch, a copy of Reform of the House of Lords will be on its way.

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About Lord Norton

Professor of Government at Hull University, and Member of the House of Lords
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One Response to And the winner of the Brexit contest…

  1. tizres says:

    “…readers have proved how inventive they can be. The entries were notable for their quantity and quality. As a result, I faced the usual problem of choosing a winner.” Hold that thought:

    “Many educational strategy proposals to better engage students assume that all students are similar in how they are motivated to do their best. Yet, students are likely to respond to educational challenges put before them very differently. Students may be engaged in different ways and perhaps not fit into a “one best model” of schooling. Ask any parent that has more than one child, and he/she is likely to tell you just how different their kids are.”
    https://blog.cruxresearch.com/2017/07/03/are-teenagers-widgets/

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