Author Archives: Lord Norton

About Lord Norton

Professor of Government at Hull University, and Member of the House of Lords

More on referendums

Last week, I was speaking in the chamber on successive days.  On Wednesday, I introduced motions to take note of two reports from the Constitution Committee on the legislative process and the following day spoke in a QSD (Question for … Continue reading

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Effective prime ministerial leadership?

Some years ago, I published an article analysing prime ministerial leadership in terms of purpose, skill and circumstance. Prime ministers need certain skills to navigate an increasingly pluralist political environment.  As I wrote, ‘The individual in the office will largely … Continue reading

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European disunion: ending a marriage

In a chapter I contributed to European Disunion: Between Sovereignty and Solidarity, published in 2012, I focused on Britain’s relationship to the European Union.  I used the analogy of a marriage: ‘… the UK can be characterised not so much … Continue reading

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The unclubbable Prime Minister

In my earlier post on the importance of informal space in Parliament, I noted that, ‘as the examples of Edward Heath and Margaret Thatcher demonstrate, party leaders cannot afford to neglect informal space.  Theresa May is not a natural when … Continue reading

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Some problems of the constitution

I have just signed a contract with Manchester University Press for a book entitled Governing Britain: Parliament, ministers and our ambiguous constitution. It is designed, as may be inferred from the title, to address uncertainties, or conundrums, in our constitutional … Continue reading

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Yet more on the Fixed-term Parliaments Act…

The saga of media misunderstanding of the Fixed-term Parliaments Act continues…. Recently, The Times carried a report asserting that, if the Government was defeated on a Queen’s Speech, both main parties would have 14-days within which to form a government … Continue reading

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